There is a massive dent in Earth’s protective layer and it’s getting bigger, says NASA – Times Now

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There is a massive dent in Earth's protective layer: NASA

There is a massive dent in Earth’s protective layer: NASA&nbsp

Key Highlights

  • As of now, NASA says the deepening rift in the SAA has no visible impact on daily life on the surface but recent forecasts have shown the region is expanding westwards
  • The SAA has been named after its location over South America and Southern Atlantic Ocean

The layer that is responsible for protecting Earth is in danger. A massive chunk of the layer has been reportedly weakening and has caused a dent in the Earth’s shield. The phenomenon is called South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and is splitting into two and getting wider as time progresses. The SAA has been named after its location over South America and Southern Atlantic Ocean.

The magnetic field around the Earth acts as a protective shield which repels and traps charged particles from the Sun. As of now, NASA says the deepening rift in the SAA has no visible impact on daily life on the surface but recent forecasts have shown the region is expanding westwards and is increasingly growing weaker. 

NASA says, “The South Atlantic Anomaly is also of interest to NASA’s Earth scientists who monitor the changes in magnetic field strength there, both for how such changes affect Earth’s atmosphere and as an indicator of what’s happening to Earth’s magnetic fields, deep inside the globe.

Currently, the SAA creates no visible impacts on daily life on the surface. However, recent observations and forecasts show that the region is expanding westward and continuing to weaken in intensity. It is also splitting – recent data shows the anomaly’s valley or region of minimum field strength, has split into two lobes, creating additional challenges for satellite missions.”

The SAA occurs from two features in the Earth’s core – the tilt of its magnetic axis, and the flow of molten metals in its outer core. 

NASA explained, “Earth is a bit like a bar magnet, with north and south poles that represent opposing magnetic

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